Pomeagle

The Pomeagle is a mixed breed dog–a cross between the Pomeranian and Beagle dog breeds. Small, affectionate, and curious by nature, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.

Pomeagles also go by the names Beagle Pom or Pomeranian Beagle mix. Despite their unfortunate status as a designer breed, you can find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and breed specific rescues, so remember to adopt! Don’t shop!

These adorable pups do well in apartments and houses with fenced yards. Just make sure the yard is secure, as they have a tendency to track and follow scents. Their wanderlust could lead them into dangerous situations, like traffic. So be careful and take extra precautions.

They also do well in large families with older children. Pomeagles love endless play sessions and activity. They should not be left alone for long periods. Multiple pet families would be ideal. Isolation is their biggest enemy.

See below for all Pomeagle facts and mixed dog breed characteristics!

Pomeagle Mixed Dog Breed Pictures

Special thanks to @jager_beggar@lu.nnah@cheyennegriffith1994, and @pawsandwander on Instagram for supplying images.

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Breed Characteristics:

Adaptability

Adapts Well to Apartment Living
4
Good For Novice Owners
4
Sensitivity Level
4
Tolerates Being Alone
1
Tolerates Cold Weather
3
Tolerates Hot Weather
2

All Around Friendliness

Affectionate with Family
5
Incredibly Kid Friendly Dogs
3
Dog Friendly
3
Friendly Toward Strangers
3

Health Grooming

Amount Of Shedding
4
Drooling Potential
1
Easy To Groom
2
General Health
3
Potential For Weight Gain
4
Size
1

Trainability

Easy To Train
3
Intelligence
2
Potential For Mouthiness
3
Prey Drive
3
Tendency To Bark Or Howl
5
Wanderlust Potential
4

Exercise Needs

Energy Level
4
Intensity
3
Exercise Needs
3
Potential For Playfulness
4

Vital Stats:

Dog Breed Group:
Mixed Breed Dogs
Height:
6 to 11 inches
Weight:
5 to 25 pounds
Life Span:
12 to 15 years

More About This Breed

  • Highlights

    • Pomeagles are mixed breed dogs. They are not purebreds like their Pomeranian or Beagle parents.
    • The main colors of Pomeagles are brown, red, fawn, cream, white, brindle, black, and sable. They are rarely a solid color and generally a combination of two or more colors.
    • Pomeagles typically have short, thick coats and are not considered hypoallergenic. One brush every other day and a bath every few months with a mild shampoo should meet their grooming needs. There are longer-coated Pomeagles, and those may require more brushing and grooming care.
    • Pomeagles are highly prone to prey drive. They should be exposed to other animals early on and supervised.
    • Pomeagles are suited for any size family and will love all members equally, but they can form a strong bond with their main care giver.
    • Isolation and Pomeagles do not mix. They should not be left alone for long periods and may do best in multiple pet households.
  • History

    The Pomeagle dog breed may have existed naturally over the years, but designer breeders started intentionally mixing Beagles and Pomeranians in the US, likely in the last 20 years.

    Breeders wanted to mix the two parent breeds to create a new companion dog and minimize the health issues that many pure breeds suffer from. They continued to create Pomeagles as demand for the mixed breed pups climbed.

    Even though the Pomeagle got its start as a designer breed, some have ended up in shelters or in the care of rescue groups. Consider adoption if you decide this is the breed for you.

    Check your local shelters, look up Pomeagle rescues, or check with breed-specific Beagle or Pomeranian rescues, as they often help to re-home the ever increasing number of mixes in need of adoption.

    Pomeagles are recognized by:

    • American Canine Hybrid Club
    • Designer Dogs Kennel Club
    • Dog Registry of America, Inc.
    • International Designer Canine Registry®
  • Size

    As the Pomeagle is a relatively new mixed breed, there are few standards when it comes to size. That said, as a mix between Pomeranian and Beagle parents, you can expect Pomeagles to be on the small side.

    Most weigh in at five to 25 pounds and range in height from six to eleven inches at the shoulder. That said, many can be smaller or larger.

    Male Pomeagles typically run a bit larger than females.

  • Personality

    Pomeagle parents often describe their dogs as being smart, affectionate, and endlessly curious. They have high energy and will want to be involved in your daily activities. They will enjoy playing games with you but may get sidetracked by new smells and go off on a new adventure.

    Pomeagles are highly prone to prey drive. They should be exposed to other animals early on and supervised. They are highly alert and will notify you when someone is at your door. If their Pomeranian parent's genes prevail, they can be yappy.

    These pups do best with early training to curb any unwanted barking habits. They can be stubborn and difficult to house train, but for a patient, consistent owner, their loyalty and desire to please will help training go a bit more smoothly. Make sure to use the positive re-enforcement method, as discipline will not go far.

    Pomeagles are suited for any size family and will love all members equally, but they can form a strong bond with their main care giver. Isolation and Pomeagles do not mix. If left alone for long periods, they may exhibit destructive behavior.

  • Health

    The Pomeagle breed is predisposed to some of the same conditions that the Pomeranians and Beagles also face. While most are generally healthy, some may be prone to a few health issues, which is why it is important to maintain good care and regular veterinary checkups.

    Some of the more common health problems Pomeagles suffer from include:

    • Patellar luxation
    • Epilepsy
    • Back problems
    • Eye problems
    • Hypothyroidism
  • Care

    As with all dogs, you should keep up with your Pomeagle's regular veterinary checkups to detect any health concerns early. Your vet can help you develop a care routine that will help keep your dog healthy.

    Pomeagles are prone to weight gain, and they have medium to high energy levels. Make sure your dog gets at least two walks per day with lots of activity and play sessions mixed it.

    If your Pomeagle has their Beagle parent's drop ears, air doesn't circulate well inside, and they are prone to ear infections. Check their ears at least every two weeks for signs of infection or waxy buildup. Check them also if you notice your Beagle shaking their head a lot or scratching at their ears. Never allow water or oils to enter their ears.

    Trim your dog's nails before they get too long--usually once or twice per month. They should not be clicking against the floor. Your groomer can help with this.

    Your main concern when it comes to your Pomeagle's care will be maintaining their oral health. You should brush their teeth daily, as small breeds are prone to dental issues. Your veterinarian can instruct you on how to brush your dog's teeth properly. Dental chews can also help with this. Tip: Chews that take your dog between 20 minutes and several days are more effective than the ones they gobble up in five minutes.

    Begin accustoming your Pomeagle to being brushed and examined during puppyhood. Handle their paws frequently--dogs are touchy about their feet. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you'll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when they're an adult.

  • Feeding

    An ideal Pomeagle diet should be formulated for a small dog with medium to high energy. They have a tendency to gain weight if they are overfed, so it's best to stick to a feeding schedule. High quality food is recommended. Two to three small meals through the day is better for digestion with this breed.

    As with all dogs, the Pomeagle's dietary needs will change from puppyhood to adulthood and will continue to change into their senior years. You should ask your veterinarian for recommendations about your Pomeagle's diet, as there is far too much variation among individual dogs--including weight, energy, and health--to make a specific recommendation.

  • Coat Color And Grooming

    Pomeagle coats are often a mix of their Pomeranian and Beagle parents' coats and colors. The main colors of Pomeagles are brown, red, fawn, cream, white, brindle, black, and sable. They are rarely a solid color and generally a combination of two or more colors.

    They typically have short, thick coats and are not considered hypoallergenic. One brush every other day and a bath every few months with a mild shampoo should meet their grooming needs. There are longer-coated Pomeagles, and those may require more brushing and grooming care.

    Pomeagle coats tend to be thicker in the winter, so your pup should be fine going for walks during the cold months. If you enjoy taking your Pomeagle for joyrides during the summer, don't leave home without having enough water for you and your dog. Keeping a bowl in your car year round is a great way to plan ahead. If your pup will be in direct sunlight for long periods consider applying dog safe sunblock to ears, nose, and sensitive areas where there is less fur coverage.

  • Children And Other Pets

    Pomeagles bond with everyone in the family and can enjoy endless play sessions with older children. Make sure they are properly socialized and always supervised with younger children. In addition, Pomeagles can be "mouthy," grabbing things, including your or your child's hand, with their mouths to play. They do this in fun and can be trained not to do this.

    As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions. Teach your child never to approach any dog while they're eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

    Because of their pack dog heritage, Pomeagles enjoy company and don't like to be left alone. Another dog or even a cat will help meet their companionship needs.

    If they take after their Pom parent, carefully monitor their behavior in public settings and around larger dogs. Poms can be confrontational and challenge larger dogs, seemingly oblivious to their size disadvantage.

    Reading about their parent Pomeranian and Beagle breeds is the best way to learn more about your Pomeagle.

  • Rescue Groups

    It may be hard to find a breed-specific rescue for Pomeagles because they are a mixed breed. However, you may want to try Pomeranian or Beagle breed-specific rescues, as they often care for mixes, as well. Here are some rescues you can try:

    You can also try DogTime's adoption page that lets you search for adoptable dogs by breed and zip code!