Daniff

The Daniff is a mixed breed dog — a cross between the English Mastiff and Great Dane dog breeds. Lovable, intelligent, and protective, these pups inherited the best qualities from both of their parents.

Daniffs go by several names, including Mastidane, English Daniff, and Great Daniff. Despite the growing popularity of this designer breed, you can find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and breed specific rescues, so remember to adopt! Don’t shop!

These big, adorable pups are a mix of two giant breeds, so they’re best suited for a home with a backyard, and they love interacting with people. They’re very smart and playful pups, so they need to be occupied with plenty of toys and sufficiently exercised. They’re also very protective of their families, and their loyalty and intimidating size make them excellent guard dogs! If you’re looking for a gentle giant with lots of affection to give, then this might be the dog for you!

See below for all mixed dog breed traits and facts about Daniffs!

Daniff Mixed Dog Breed Pictures

Breed Characteristics:

Adaptability

Adapts Well To Apartment Living
2
Good For Novice Owners
2
Sensitivity Level
3
Tolerates Being Alone
1
Tolerates Cold Weather
4
Tolerates Hot Weather
3

All Around Friendliness

Affectionate With Family
5
Kid-Friendly
4
Dog Friendly
4
Friendly Toward Strangers
3

Health And Grooming Needs

Amount Of Shedding
2
Drooling Potential
4
Easy To Groom
1
General Health
3
Potential For Weight Gain
3
Size
5

Trainability

Easy To Train
4
Intelligence
4
Potential For Mouthiness
2
Prey Drive
2
Tendency To Bark Or Howl
1
Wanderlust Potential
2

Physical Needs

Energy Level
3
Intensity
4
Exercise Needs
4
Potential For Playfulness
4

Vital Stats:

Dog Breed Group:
Mixed Breed Dogs
Height:
27 to 33 inches
Weight:
115 to 190 pounds
Life Span:
8 to 12 years

More About This Breed

  • Highlights

    • Daniffs are mixed breed dogs. They are not purebreds like their Great Dane or English Mastiff parents.
    • The most common Daniff coat colors include fawn, black and white, brindle, and even two unique color patterns called merle and harlequin.
    • Daniffs usually have very short coats and do shed, so they are not the best choice for those who suffer with allergies.
    • Since the Daniff is such a large dog, they can easily knock down a small child unintentionally if they become rambunctious, so an adult should always be present. That said, Daniffs love to play with people of all ages.
    • Many Daniffs get along fine with other dogs and cats, but must be socialized and well trained early on to ensure a happy and safe cohabitation.
    • Training a Daniff puppy may come with some challenges. While this mix is very intelligent, they may also tend to be a bit stubborn.
    • Daniffs can be just as lazy as they can be playful. Daily thirty minute walks and playing with a variety of toys will help to keep your dog happy and healthy.
  • History

    The Daniff mixed dog breed is said to have originated in the U.S over the past ten to 15 years, but this designer breed is quickly growing in popularity.

    Both parent breeds were historically used for protection but were also wonderful companion animals, as well, making this gentle giant an excellent mix of two breeds with great personalities, suitable for being both intimidating guard dogs and perfect family pets.

    Even though the Daniff got their start as a designer breed, some have ended up in shelters or rescue groups. If this breed is right for you, make sure to check your local animal shelters and breed specific rescue groups.

  • Size

    As the Daniff is a relatively new mixed breed, there are a few variations in size. Both Great Danes and English Mastiffs are giant breeds, so you can expect to have a very large adult dog.

    Most Daniffs range in height from 27 to 33 inches and can weigh in anywhere from 115 pounds to about 190 pounds, depending on the gender of the pup and the sizes of the parents. Males will tend to be on the larger side and females can be slightly smaller.

  • Personality

    Many Daniff owners describe these dogs as lovable, protective of their families, and gentle giants. Although their sheer size alone may be off-putting for some, especially children, Daniffs will quickly warm up to you and want to do nothing more than cuddle.

    Since both parent breeds were bred as guard dogs and to hunt large game, the Daniff's prey drive is low, but the're still the perfect guard dog. They tend to not bark until they need to alert their family of a stranger arriving at the house. If a new person does enter the home, the Daniff may be a bit apprehensive at first but will warm up to new people once they realize they are not a threat.

    Training a Daniff puppy may come with some challenges. While this mix is very intelligent, they may also tend to be a bit stubborn. The most important thing to do is start training the new pup as soon as possible. Be firm, use positive reinforcement, and make sure everyone in the household is involved. It's imperative to have a well trained Daniff since their large size will make them very difficult for an owner to control as an adult.

    Daniffs are very friendly and can adapt to live just as happily in a household with a large family as they would in a one-person home.

  • Health

    The Daniff is a fairly healthy breed but is predisposed to conditions shared by both Great Danes and English Mastiffs. While most are generally healthy, some may be prone to some of these issues so it is very important to keep up with regular veterinary checkups.

    Some of the more common health problems Daniffs suffer from include:

    • Bloat
    • Hip/Elbow dysplasia
    • Cancer
    • Heart issues
  • Care

    As with all dogs, you should take your pet in for regular veterinary checkups in order to keep your pup healthy and be able to detect any health issues as early as possible. Your vet will create a care routine for your dog.

    Oral health is important for every dog and teeth should ideally be brushed daily. Larger breed dogs tend to have fewer issues with their teeth, so your veterinarian instruct you on how to brush their teeth properly.

    Daniffs are prone to hip dysplasia and joint issues, so it's very important to keep your pup at a healthy weight to avoid putting too much stress on the joints.

    Daniffs can be just as lazy as they can be playful. Daily thirty minute walks and playing with a variety of toys will help to keep your dog happy and healthy.

    It's especially important to give plenty of toys that will occupy and stimulate your dog's brain to keep them from getting bored, which can lead to destructive behaviors.

    Since Daniffs have big, floppy ears, it's best to check them daily to ensure that there isn't any debris building up and clean them as recommended by your vet. Nail trims are recommended to be done once or twice per month, and if the owner can't trim them by themselves, a groomer or veterinarian can help with this.

  • Feeding

    An ideal Daniff diet should be formulated for a giant breed with medium energy. They're very energetic as puppies and require a great deal of food to accommodate their large size and fast metabolism.

    They can be prone to bloat so make sure to watch your pup as they eat and make sure they don't eat too quickly. It's important to make sure your Daniff doesn't become overweight, as it can put stress on their joints.

    As with all dogs, the Daniff's dietary needs will change from puppyhood to adulthood and will continue to change into their senior years. You should ask your veterinarian for recommendations about your Daniff's diet, as there is far too much variation among individual dogs--including weight, energy, and health--to make a specific recommendation.

  • Coat Color And Grooming

    Both of the Daniff's parents' coats offer many colors. While English Mastiffs typically come in colors such as fawn, brindle, or apricot, the Great Dane has several more. That being the case, the Daniff can come in several different colors and patterns, too.

    The most common of these include fawn, black and white, brindle, and even two unique color patterns called merle and harlequin.

    Daniffs usually have very short coats and do shed, so they are not the best choice for those who suffer with allergies. Seeing as the hair is so short, grooming is very easy and brushing is usually performed once or twice a week.

    Because the Daniff has a shorter coat, they can't tolerate very cold weather. They may need a large doggy jacket in winter. Even though their coat may be short, if the Daniff has the trait of a shorter muzzle like that of the English Mastiff, your pup should not be outdoors in hot weather for long periods of time, either, due to possible breathing issues.

  • Children And Other Pets

    Since the Daniff is such a large dog, they can easily knock down a small child unintentionally if they become rambunctious, so an adult should always be present. Daniffs love to play with people of all ages but, again, their intimidating size makes it very important that children--and adults, too--must be aware of how strong these dogs are and know how to properly and safely interact.

    Daniffs are outgoing and, if introduced and socialized with other pets while they are young, will do fine in a household with other dogs. It is very important to introduce your pup to other dogs slowly, especially if the other dog is smaller than the Daniff.

    Many Daniffs get along fine with other dogs and cats, but must be socialized and well trained early on to ensure a happy and safe cohabitation.

  • Rescue Groups

    It may be hard to find a breed-specific rescue for Daniffs because they are a mixed breed. However, you may want to try Great Dane or English Mastiff breed specific rescues, as they often care for mixes, as well. Rescues that cater to large or giant breeds might also be able to help. Here are some rescues you can try:

    You can also try DogTime's adoption page that lets you search for adoptable dogs by breed and zip code!

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