Corman Shepherd

The Corman Shepherd is a mixed breed dog–a cross between the Corgi and the German Shepherd Dog breeds. Loyal, courageous, and a bit stubborn, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.

Corman Shepherds go by several names, including the German Corgi and the Corgi German Shepherd. Despite their unfortunate status as a designer breed, you can find these adorable mixed-breed dogs in shelters and breed specific rescues, so remember to adopt! Don’t shop!

These goofy pups make excellent family pets, though they can also manage in smaller spaces like condos and apartments, provided that the owner is incredibly active. They have a tendency to guard and be stubborn, so the Corman Shepherd may get aggressive towards strangers unless they are trained and socialized.

If you’re looking for a dog who will alert you whenever someone’s knocking at the door or who will do a goofy dance every time you offer a treat, the Corman Shepherd might be the right dog for you!

See below for all Corman Shepherd facts and mixed dog breed characteristics!

Corman Shepherd Mixed Dog Breed Pictures

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Breed Characteristics:

Adaptability

Adapts Well to Apartment Living
2
Good For Novice Owners
2
Sensitivity Level
3
Tolerates Being Alone
3
Tolerates Cold Weather
4
Tolerates Hot Weather
3

All Around Friendliness

Affectionate with Family
4
Incredibly Kid Friendly Dogs
4
Dog Friendly
4
Friendly Toward Strangers
3

Health Grooming

Amount Of Shedding
5
Drooling Potential
2
Easy To Groom
3
General Health
3
Potential For Weight Gain
4
Size
3

Trainability

Easy To Train
4
Intelligence
5
Potential For Mouthiness
3
Prey Drive
3
Tendency To Bark Or Howl
3
Wanderlust Potential
2

Exercise Needs

Energy Level
4
Intensity
3
Exercise Needs
4
Potential For Playfulness
4

Vital Stats:

Dog Breed Group:
Mixed Breed Dogs
Height:
12 to 15 inches
Weight:
20 to 70 pounds
Life Span:
10 to 15 years

More About This Breed

  • Highlights

    • The main colors of Corman Shepherds are gold, white, brown and black. Rarely will you find a solid-colored Corman Shepherd; their coats are often a blend of two or more colors.
    • Your Corman Shepherd will likely have blowing seasons to shed their seasonal coats. Brush your Corman Shepherd on a daily basis to keep fur tumbleweeds from taking over your home.
    • The Corman Shepherd is a very friendly dog, and many enthusiasts love how well they interact with the children in their families. They can, however, be very protective and aloof around strangers or new pets.
    • You may find that your Corman Shepherd tries to herd you or other humans. They can be somewhat stubborn, so it is good to curb this type of behavior early on with the proper training.
    • Corman Shepherds have high energy levels. Make sure your dog gets at least one good half-hour- to hour-long walk per day with a few good, active play sessions and shorter walks mixed in.
    • Corman Shepherds are also highly intelligent, which means they can get bored easily. Be sure to provide your Corman Shepherd mixed breed dog plenty of mental stimulation, or they may engage in destructive or unwanted behaviors.
  • History

    The Corman Shepherd dog breed may have existed naturally over the years, but designer breeders started intentionally mixing Corgis and German Shepherd Dogs in the early 2000s, likely in North America.

    While there is no known origin or exact reason as to why breeders started breeding Corman Shepherds intentionally, it could be due to the Corgi's growing popularity. Breeders may have wanted to combine the charm of the Corgi with the protectiveness of a German Shepherd Dog. They continued to create Corman Shepherds as demand for the mixed breed pups climbed.

    Even though the Corman Shepherd breed got its start as a designer breed, some have ended up in shelters or in the care of rescue groups. Consider adoption if you decide this is the breed for you.

    Check your local shelters, look up Corman Shepherd rescues, or check with breed-specific German Shepherd or Corgi rescues, as they sometimes take in mixed breed dogs and find homes for them.

  • Size

    Since the Corman Shepherd is a relatively new mixed breed, there are few standards when it comes to size. That said, as a mix between German Shepherd and Corgi parents, you can expect Corman Shepherds to be on the medium to large side.

    Most weigh in anywhere between 20 to 70 pounds and range in height from twelve to 15 inches at the shoulder. However, many can be smaller or larger.

  • Personality

    Many Corman Shepherd enthusiasts describe their mixed breed dog as a spunky, loving pup who has a lot of energy to burn.

    Corgis are a herding breed, so you may find that your Corman Shepherd tries to herd you or other humans wherever they go! They can be somewhat stubborn, so it is good to curb this type of behavior early on with the proper training.

    Thanks to the German Shepherd in them, Corman Shepherds can also be a very protective breed. This makes the Corman Shepherd an ideal companion for someone living alone who wants their own personal alert system, or with a family who is looking for a little added protection.

    This guarding instinct could turn possessive if not checked, so be sure to set boundaries with your Corman Shepherd as soon as possible.

    Corman Shepherds are also highly intelligent, which means they can get bored easily. Be sure to provide your Corman Shepherd mixed breed dog plenty of mental stimulation, be in the form of some active time with kids in the backyard or fun puzzle toys.

    While Corman Shepherds can get attached to one particular person, they also make incredible family pets. As long as they are properly socialized, the Corman Shepherd is friendly enough to get along with just about anyone.

  • Health

    The Corman Shepherd breed is predisposed to some of the same conditions that the Corgi and German Shepherd also face. While most are generally healthy, some may be prone to a few health issues, which is why it is important to maintain good care and regular veterinary checkups.

    Some of the more common health problems Corman Shepherds suffer from include:

    • Joint dysplasia
    • Bloat
    • cataracts
    • Allergies
    • Obesity
    • Back issues
  • Care

    As with all dogs, you should keep up with your Corman Shepherd's regular veterinary checkups to detect any health concerns early. Your vet can help you develop a care routine that will keep your dog healthy.

    Corman Shepherds are prone to weight gain, and they have high energy levels. Make sure your dog gets at least one good half-hour- to hour-long walk per day with a few good, active play sessions and shorter walks mixed in. They are also incredibly smart dogs, so throw in some mentally stimulating activities to keep your Corman Shepherd happy.

    Check their ears for debris and pests daily and clean them as recommended by your vet. Trim your dog's nails before they get too long--usually once or twice per month. They should not be clicking against the floor. Your groomer can help with this.

    Your main concern when it comes to your Corman Shepherd will be keeping them at a healthy weight--and from destroying your home out of boredom. Be sure to give your Corman Shepherd plenty of exercise, and talk to your vet if your pup seems to be putting on excess weight or is displaying destructive behaviors.

  • Feeding

    An ideal Corman Shepherd diet should be formulated for a medium-sized breed with high energy. This mixed breed has a tendency to gain weight if overfed, so you should stick to a regular feeding schedule and not leave food out during the day. Limit their amount of treats, too.

    As with all dogs, the Corman Shepherd's dietary needs will change from puppyhood to adulthood and will continue to change into their senior years. You should ask your veterinarian for recommendations about your Corman Shepherd's diet, as there is far too much variation among individual dogs--including weight, energy, and health--to make a specific recommendation.

  • Coat Color And Grooming

    Corman Shepherd coats are often a mix of their Corgi and German Shepherd parents' coats and colors. The main colors of Corman Shepherds are gold, white, brown and black. Rarely will you find a solid-colored Corman Shepherd; their coats are often a blend of two or more colors.

    They have double coats, which can be incredibly dense. This means there's a lot of shedding, and your Corman Shepherd will likely have blowing seasons to shed their seasonal coats. Brush your Corman Shepherd on a daily basis to keep fur tumbleweeds from taking over your home.

    Thanks to their dense coats, Corman Shepherds tend to do well in colder climates. This coat also means that they should be carefully monitored for heat stroke in hot climates. No matter the extreme, do not leave your Corman Shepherd (or any dog) outside for extended periods of time.

  • Children And Other Pets

    Corman Shepherd's size can range greatly, and smaller dogs can be easily injured by children who are overly excited or don't know how to properly interact with a dog. That said, the Corman Shepherd is a very friendly dog, and many enthusiasts love how well they interact with the children in their families.

    When it comes to other pets, Corman Shepherdss can get along with other animals if they are introduced slowly and calmly, and early socialization will help this go smoothly. It's best if they get used to other pets early. Due to their protective natures, Corman Shepherds can be wary of new or strange animals.

    Still, many Corman Shepherds get along just fine with other dogs and cats, so it really comes down to training, socialization, and the luck of the draw.

  • Rescue Groups

    It may be hard to find a breed-specific rescue for Corman Shepherds because they are a mixed breed. However, you may want to try Corgi or German Shepherd Dog breed-specific rescues, as they often care for mixes, as well. Here are some rescues you can try:

    You can also try DogTime's adoption page that lets you search for adoptable dogs by breed and zip code!