Australian Shepherd Lab Mix

The Australian Shepherd Lab Mix is a mixed breed dog–a cross between the Australian Shepherd and the Labrador Retriever dog breeds. Medium in size, energetic, and loyal, these pups inherited some amazing traits from both of their parents.

Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes are also called Aussiedors, Australian Shepradors, Aussie Shepradors, Aussie Labs, and Shepradors. Despite their unfortunate status as a designer breed, you can find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and breed specific rescues, so adopt! Don’t shop!

These athletic, alert pups are best suited for level two dog parents, so some dog parenting experience is needed. These pups do not do well with home bodies. They like active people and would really like having their intelligence put to use. Give them a job to do and watch them excel!

See below for all Australian Shepherd Lab Mix facts and mixed dog breed traits!

Australian Shepherd Lab Mixed Dog Breed Pictures

Additional articles that will interest you:

Breed Characteristics:

Adaptability

Adapts Well to Apartment Living
2
Good For Novice Owners
2
Sensitivity Level
5
Tolerates Being Alone
4
Tolerates Cold Weather
5
Tolerates Hot Weather
4

All Around Friendliness

Affectionate with Family
4
Incredibly Kid Friendly Dogs
4
Dog Friendly
4
Friendly Toward Strangers
4

Health Grooming

Amount Of Shedding
4
Drooling Potential
2
Easy To Groom
4
General Health
4
Potential For Weight Gain
3
Size
4

Trainability

Easy To Train
5
Intelligence
5
Potential For Mouthiness
4
Prey Drive
3
Tendency To Bark Or Howl
3
Wanderlust Potential
5

Exercise Needs

Energy Level
5
Intensity
5
Exercise Needs
5
Potential For Playfulness
5

Vital Stats:

Dog Breed Group:
Mixed Breed Dogs
Height:
22 to 25 inches
Weight:
40 to 80 pounds
Life Span:
12 to 15 years

More About This Breed

  • Highlights

    • Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes are mixed breed dog. They are not purebreds like their Australian Shepherd or Labrador Retriever parents.
    • The main colors of Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes are brown, cream, black, tan, and brindle. They are often a blend and mix of any of these colors.
    • These dogs are generally not recommended for people with allergies. They tend to shed quite a bit.
    • Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes can be very tolerant of children, but like all dogs, should be supervised when around youngsters. They may try to herd small children thinking they are part of their flock.
    • Australian Shepherd Labs do get along with other dogs but it is important to socialize puppies. This gets them used to other dogs and also to people, although they are also affectionate to strangers.
    • These pups like to stay active through the day. If they get bored, they could become destructive. They enjoy activities like frisbee, swimming, hiking, and walking. If you need a running partner, the Aussie Shepherd Lab could be your new coach.
  • History

    The Australian Shepherd Lab mixed dog breed may have existed naturally over the years, but designer breeders started intentionally mixing Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retrievers in the late 1990s, likely in North America.

    The mix's Labradors Retriever parent hails from Newfoundland where they worked along side fishermen. Today they make great companions and guide dogs, and often work as drug detection dogs. They need to have jobs and are happiest when they are active.

    The mix's Australian Shepherd parent is actually from the US. They were originally bread to herd cattle and need to stay active. They're also happiest when they have a job to do.

    The Aussie Shepherd Lab mix was bread to be a super working dog. Mixing two breeds also minimizes health issues that tend to affect pure breeds, as they are often inbred. Breeders continued to create Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes as demand for the mixed breed pups climbed.

    Even though the Australian Shepherd Lab Mix got their start as a designer breed, some have ended up in shelters or in the care of rescue groups. Consider adoption if you decide this is the pup for you. Check your local shelters, look up Australian Shepherd Lab Mix rescues, or check with breed specific Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retriever rescues, as they sometimes help to re-home mixed breed dogs.

    Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes are not recognized by American Kennel Club; they can, however, be registered with:

    • American Canine Hybrid Club - ACHC
    • Dog Registry of America Club - ACHC
    • Designer Dogs Kennel Club - DDKC
    • International Designer Canine Registry - IDCR
  • Size

    As the Australian Shepherd Lab Mix is a relatively new mixed breed, there are few standards when it comes to size. That said, as a mix between Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retriever parents, you can expect Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes to be in the medium size range.

    Most weigh in at 40 to 80 pounds and range in height from 22 to 25 inches at the shoulder. However, many can be smaller or larger than average.

  • Personality

    If you mix two very popular breeds like the Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retriever, you get the lovable Aussie Shepherd Lab Mix. Many Australian Shepherd Lab Mix lovers describe their dogs as protective, loyal, athletic companions. They are medium in size and full of energy and with lots of love to give.

    One thing Australian Shepherd Labs are not good at is being alone for long periods of time. Without the companionship they need—as well as exercise and the chance to put their intelligence to work—they become bored and frustrated. An Australian Shepherd Lab who is under-exercised and ignored by their family is likely to express pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as chewing and destroying furniture.

    Like every dog, the Australian Shepherd Lab needs early socialization. Lots of walks and outings to local parks can help with this. Observe your pup's behavior around other animals, particularly small ones.

  • Health

    The Australian Shepherd Lab mixed breed is predisposed to some of the same conditions that the Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retriever also face. While most are generally healthy, some may be prone to a few health issues, which is why it is important to maintain good care and regular veterinary checkups.

    Some of the more common problems Australian Shepherd Labs suffer from include:

    • Elbow Dysplasia
    • Hip Dysplasia
    • Cataracts
  • Care

    As with all dogs, you should keep up with your Australian Shepherd Lab Mix's regular veterinary checkups to detect any health concerns early. Your vet can help you develop a care routine that will keep your dog healthy.

    Australian Shepherd Labs are prone to weight gain, and they have high energy levels. These pups like to stay active through the day. If they get bored, they could become destructive. They enjoy activities like frisbee, swimming, hiking, and walking. If you need a running partner, the Aussie Shepherd Lab could be your new coach.

    Your dog's eyes should be cleaned as needed with a clean cloth, and ears should be cleaned regularly without putting any liquid in the ear canal. Opt for cotton balls over q-tips. Due to their floppy ears they are prone to infection. They should be checked weekly for redness or a strong odor. This may indicate signs of an infection.

    Trim your dog's nails before they get too long--usually once or twice per month. They should not be clicking against the floor. Your groomer can help with this.

    One main concern when it comes to your Australian Shepherd Labs care will be maintaining their oral health. You should brush their teeth daily, as this breed is prone to tartar buildup. Your veterinarian can instruct you on how to brush your dog's teeth properly. Dental chews can also help combat the plaque buildup.

  • Feeding

    An Australian Shepherd Lab Mix diet should be formulated for a medium-sized breed with high energy. How much your adult dog eats depends on their size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level.

    As with all dogs, the Australian Shepherd Lab's dietary needs will change from puppyhood to adulthood and continue to change into their senior years. You should ask your veterinarian for recommendations about your Australian Shepherd Lab diet, as there is far too much variation among individual dogs--including weight, energy, and health--to make a specific recommendation.

  • Coat Color And Grooming

    Australian Shepherd Lab coats are often a mix of their Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retriever parents' coats and colors. The main colors of Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes are brown, cream, black, tan, and brindle. They are often a blend and mix of any of these colors.

    They usually have short to medium length coats, and they're generally not recommended for people with allergies. They tend to shed quite a bit, if you are not familiar with robotic vacuums, consider looking into a RoboVac.

    These pups will require a few good brushes per week. Only bathe as needed with a mild shampoo so you don't strip the coat of its natural oils. Brushing will also help to spread the oils throughout the coat.

    Australian Shepherd Lab mixes have a water resistant top coat and a warm undercoat. They are resilient in rain and snow.

  • Children And Other Pets

    Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes make great pets for households with older children. They can be very tolerant of children, but like all dogs, should be supervised when around youngsters. They may try to herd small children thinking they are part of their flock.

    Always teach kids how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while they're eating or to try to take the dog's food away. This can't be stated enough--no dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

    Australian Shepherd Labs do get along with other dogs but it is important to socialize puppies. This gets them used to other dogs and also to people, although they are also affectionate to strangers. Socialization teaches puppies how to behave and greet other dogs.

    Find out if this is the right dog for you by learning about their Australian Shepherd and Labrador Retriever parents.

  • Rescue Groups

    It may be hard to find a breed-specific rescue for Australian Shepherd Lab Mixes because they are a mixed breed. However, you may want to try Australian Shepherd or Labrador Retriever breed specific rescues, as they often care for mixes, as well. Here are some rescues you can try:

    You can also try DogTime's adoption page that lets you search for adoptable dogs by breed and zip code!