Can Dogs Eat Shrimp? Is Shrimp Safe For Dogs?

Dog so cute mixed breed with Shih-Tzu, Pomeranian and Poodle sitting at wooden table outdoor restaurant waiting to eat a prawn fried shrimp seasoning salt feed by people is a pet owner

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Can dogs eat shrimp? This might be something that’s crossed your mind if your dog begged for a bite while you were preparing a batch of the crustaceans for a summertime shrimp boil. If humans can eat shrimp, can dogs safely eat it too?

The short answer is yes, dogs can eat shrimp. There are a good amount of health benefits that come with feeding a dog shrimp, including very high levels of vitamin B12. Although, there are a few key cooking and serving considerations that you’ll need to be aware of before adding shrimp to your canine’s menu.

As always, you must ask your regular vet before sharing any human food with your favorite canine, including shrimp. Here’s what you need to know about shrimp and dogs.

How Is Shrimp Good For Dogs?

When it comes to seafood that’s beneficial for dogs to eat, shrimp is a great option. First of all, it’s very high in vitamin B12, which is excellent for soothing stomach issues your pooch might be suffering from.

Shrimp also contains a lot of niacin, which can assist with your dog’s fat and energy production along with improving blood circulation.

The amount of phosphorus present in shrimp means that it can help to improve the condition of your dog’s bones.

Finally, the low-fat nature of shrimp makes it a very appropriate food to add to your canine’s regular meals.

How Can I Safely Give Shrimp To My Dog?

Young women preparing shrimps with white wine,chili pepper and parsley at home

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Always cook any shrimp that you’re intending to serve to your dog. This is to avoid the chance of your dog consuming any toxins or pathogens that could be present in uncooked shrimp.

The most effective and appropriate way to cook shrimp for your dog is to steam them. Also, avoid the temptation to add any extra salts or spices to the shrimp while you’re cooking it.

While some dogs might seem enthusiastic about the idea of eating whole shrimp, including the shells, it’s always safest to remove the shells and the tail of the shrimp before serving them up to your hungry pooch. This is because the shells have the potential to become a choking hazard.

Finally, when it comes to the amount of shrimp you should give to your dog, it’s a good practice to keep it to just one or two shrimp per sitting. As ever, consult with your regular veterinarian about the precise amount of any human food that will be appropriate for your dog.

Does your dog ever enjoy eating shrimp? How do you serve it to your dog? Tell us all about it in the comments section below!