Bordoodle

The Bordoodle is a mixed breed dog–a cross between the Border Collie and Poodle dog breeds. Friendly, playful, and intelligent, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.

Bordoodles are also sometimes known as Borpoos and Borderpoos. You can find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and breed specific rescues, so remember to always adopt! Don’t shop if you’re looking to add a Bordoodle to your home!

The Bordoodle makes for an excellent family dog. They’re friendly, love companionship, and will even become protective towards your family. The mixed breed is relatively low maintenance and is tolerant of most people, from very young to very old.

Just be warned. Due to the Bordoodle’s intelligence, they can start to show stubborn traits if they don’t get proper socialization and training from a young age. Destructive behavior could even become an issue. But if you make sure you train your Bordoodle well, you’ll have the ultimately family dog!

See below for all Bordoodle facts and mixed dog breed characteristics!

Bordoodle Mixed Dog Breed Pictures

Additional articles that will interest you:

Breed Characteristics:

Adaptability

Adapts Well to Apartment Living
4
Good For Novice Owners
4
Sensitivity Level
3
Tolerates Being Alone
3
Tolerates Cold Weather
4
Tolerates Hot Weather
4

All Around Friendliness

Affectionate with Family
4
Incredibly Kid Friendly Dogs
5
Dog Friendly
3
Friendly Toward Strangers
2

Health Grooming

Amount Of Shedding
2
Drooling Potential
2
Easy To Groom
4
General Health
4
Potential For Weight Gain
3
Size
3

Trainability

Easy To Train
4
Intelligence
5
Potential For Mouthiness
3
Prey Drive
2
Tendency To Bark Or Howl
2
Wanderlust Potential
3

Exercise Needs

Energy Level
3
Intensity
2
Exercise Needs
3
Potential For Playfulness
4

Vital Stats:

Dog Breed Group:
Mixed Breed Dogs
Height:
12 to 22 inches
Weight:
30 to 60 pounds
Life Span:
12 to 15 years

More About This Breed

  • Highlights

    • The Bordoodle is a mixed breed dog. They are not purebreds like their Border Collie or Poodle parents.
    • Bordoodles come in a range of coat colors and patterns, usually incorporating a mix of black, white, gray and brown.
    • Bordoodles don't shed too much. Brushing your dog one or two times a week should suffice.
    • These dogs are extremely smart, but that intelligence can sometimes manifest itself in destructive behavior if the dog is left alone or not properly trained.
    • Children and Bordoodles are a great mix. In general, you couldn't ask for a better family dog than the Bordoodle. It's still important to supervise playtime with all kids and dogs.
    • A couple of walks every day, totaling around 45 minutes, should do the trick to keep the dog happy and healthy. Although, due to the mixed breed's intelligence, it's of great benefit to incorporate obedience tasks into the exercise mix to keep the dog alert.
  • History

    The Bordoodle is one of the newest dog breeds around, so there's not that much accurate information about how they first came on the scene. But if you take a look at the history of their parent breeds, you can start to understand where the Bordoodle comes from.

    The Poodle breed can be traced all the way back to ancient Egypt times. After that, the dog became popular in France as a duck hunting dog.

    When it comes to the Border Collie, it's said the breed was beloved by Queen Victoria and descended from British sheep-herding dogs. At one point, the Border Collie was even known as the Scotch Sheep Dog!

    The Bordoodle has become known as a designer dog breed, but many of them unfortunately end up in shelters. So consider contacting your local rescue groups and shelters if you're thinking about adding the Bordoodle to your home.

  • Size

    The Bordoodle is usually described as a medium-sized dog. Although, as is always the case with newer dog breeds, exact size standards might vary.

    Most weigh in at 30 to 60 pounds and range in height from twelve to 22 inches.

  • Personality

    When people describe their Bordoodles, they usually say that they're both highly sociable and extremely intelligent dogs. This is true. The mixed breed usually gets along great with families and will love to become a part of daily activities and routines.

    They're happy to chill out and snuggle, but also happy to join in play sessions with the kids. The breed's intelligence means that they also take well to training and will enjoy being mentally stimulated, especially if given fetch and herding-style tasks to undertake.

    Just be warned that this same intelligence can sometimes manifest itself in destructive behavior if the dog is left alone or not properly trained. So make sure to let the Bordoodle become a central part of your family and enjoy a great dog!

    Also be aware that the Bordoodle will quickly become protective towards the family that adopts them. While the mixed breed might not look like a classic guard dog, they will prove wary of strangers. This is a dog who's loyal to the people who show them love.

  • Health

    Bordoodles are generally considered to be healthy dogs; although, the mixed breed can be predisposed to some of the same conditions that the Border Collie and Poodle face. As always, it's important to schedule regular wellness visits with your dog's vet.

    Some of the more common health problems Bordoodles suffer from include:

    • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
    • Epilepsy
    • Hip Dysplasia
  • Care

    As with all dogs, it's important to keep up your Bordoodle's regular veterinary checkups to detect any health concerns early. Your vet can help you develop a care routine that will keep your dog healthy.

    The Bordoodle is a dog with medium energy and exercise needs. A couple of walks every day, totaling around 45 minutes, should do the trick to keep the dog happy and healthy. Although, due to the mixed breed's intelligence, it's of great benefit to incorporate obedience tasks into the exercise mix to keep the dog alert.

    Thankfully, the Bordoodle can adapt easily to apartment living, so don't worry if you live in an urban area without access to great expanses of outdoor space.

    When it comes to dental care, try and brush your Bordoodle's teeth every day or at least a few times a week. Consult your regular vet if you need advice on how best to carry out canine teeth cleanings. Also, check the mixed breed's paw pads and nails every week or so for any signs of damage, and trim the dog's nails every fortnight. Make sure to check their ears for debris or pests and clean them as recommended by your vet.

  • Feeding

    An ideal Bordoodle diet should be formulated for a medium breed with medium energy.

    Bordoodles need to stick to a healthy diet, as overeating can cause weight gain and associated health problems, especially if adequate exercise isn't offered.

    As with all dogs, the Bordoodle's dietary needs will change from puppyhood to adulthood and will continue to change into their senior years. You should ask your veterinarian for recommendations about your Bordoodle's diet, as there is far too much variation among individual dogs--including weight, energy, and health--to make a specific recommendation.

  • Coat Color And Grooming

    You'll see the Bordoodle in a range of coat colors and patterns, usually incorporating a mix of black, white, gray and brown.

    The Bordoodle's coat is somewhere between medium and long in terms of length, and described as soft to the touch and wavy. Shedding is on the lower side of things--brushing the dog one or two times a week should suffice.

    In general, the Bordoodle is an adaptable dog when it comes to climate. Make sure to provide a suitable dog coat if the weather seems like it's getting too frosty and your canine seems cold. Also, during hotter months, make sure shade and fresh water are always available during outdoor play and activity sessions.

  • Children And Other Pets

    Children and Bordoodles are a great mix--just be sure to follow the usual guidelines of ensuring proper socialization and training takes place at an early age for both kids and dogs. But in general, you couldn't ask for a better family dog than the Bordoodle.

    When it comes to existing household pets, the breed is usually fine. But always supervise those first interactions and make sure that boundaries are set if necessary.

    Ultimately, early socialization really pays off with this breed. Make sure to reward your Bordoodle for good behavior and adhere to a proper training regime when you bring them home to your family.

  • Rescue Groups

    It may be hard to find a breed-specific rescue for Bordoodles because they are a mixed breed. However, you may want to try Border Collie or Poodle breed-specific rescues, as they often care for mixes, as well. Here are some rescues you can try:

    You can also try DogTime's adoption page that lets you search for adoptable dogs by breed and zip code!